The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

★★★★☆

I actually had to read this novel for school. And surprisingly, for once, it was pretty good. This international bestseller by Markus Zusak won many awards for its complicated story and wonderful characters.

Liesel Meminger is the main character in the book, and her story is told through the perspective of “Death” in Germany during the 30’s and the Second World War. She is a young German girl who is fostered by two poor parents and as the story goes on, Liesel grows into a teenage girl. Along the way, she develops family relationships, makes friends, learns valuable lessons, and creates her own values, all while the horrors of Hitler’s rise and the war occur. It’s a coming-of-age novel that will strike a chord with readers.

Image result for the book thief

Let me start by saying that this book is bursting with literary devices. The entire book is quite literally one giant metaphor, as “Death” tells the story. Every page has a metaphor somewhere, used in some way. You could be talking about socks and there would still be some deep metaphor made by the author. This is really great for analyzing and interpreting the multiple meanings. When I was discussing this book in a seminar, we all interpreted the book differently, and our answers were all reasonable. The descriptions are so detailed and the language used is not complicated and not too easy, which I like in a book.

The fact that Death tells the story, I found, was very interesting. It created a lot of literary devices and all, but it was also interesting to see how Zusak used Death to illustrate its role in the war. He talks about how “busy” Death becomes in the war and how demanding Hitler is of Death. I think it’s quite clever, and it was enjoyable to read these parts.

The thing I didn’t like about the book is that it is so unnecessarily long. There are countless parts in the book where I could not find a single explanation as to what it adds to the book. Trust me when I say I genuinely tried to find its relevance to the book; I was being graded on my analysis. Not only were these parts useless, but they were just plain boring! Some characters have no real purpose in the book. In fact, they just take away from the story. This book would be so much better if it was less than 584 pages.

Overall, this book was pretty enjoyable. I would recommend this to freshmen, not sophomores (as I was when I read this book). Thanks for reading!

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Author: SK

Hey. I'm SK. Those are my initials and now my code name. I'm a junior in high school. I'm aiming for business school right now! I enjoy reading, photography, writing things, movies, shopping, R&B + rock music, and good memes.

3 thoughts on “The Book Thief by Markus Zusak”

  1. I’m curious: in a coming-of-age story, which explores both the good and the bad, the interesting and the not, what did you find not interesting and boring about this book? I first read it as a sophomore as well, and as a last-year English graduate student, I continue to fall deeper and deeper in love with this book. I am genuinely interested in what parts you would cut out, as I’ve studied and analyzed the life out of this thing for about seven years now and always find something new and exciting to pull out of it.

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    1. I can sometimes be an impatient reader. I found some parts unnecessary because in my analysis of the story, they had no real purpose. Maybe if I read the book again I would pick up on some parts’ importance. Right now, off the top of my head, I couldn’t specifically say which parts I would cut out because I actually read this book a while ago and this review has been in my drafts for a while. I’m not the best at analyzing and it’s amazing how you can find so many interesting things in it! I respect that very much.

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